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Leroy Jones, Jr. is the creator of Talking Technology with Leroy Jones, Jr.

PRIVACY WAVE

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PrivacyWave_May 2010.jpgIf this is the direction:

Good-Bye to Privacy?

What happens next?



More information at Talking Technology with Leroy Jones, Jr.:

PRIVACY FACE





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TECH TERM - IP SPLICING

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TechTerm_Image 2008.pngInternet Protocol (IP) Splicing

Definition: An action whereby an active, established, session is intercepted and co-opted by the unauthorized user.

IP splicing attacks may occur after an authentication has been made, permitting the attacker to assume the role of an already authorized user.

Primary protections against IP splicing rely on encryption at the session or network layer.



IPSplic_May 2010.jpg





TECH TERM - INTERNET PROTOCOL

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TechTerm_Image 2008.pngInternet Protocol
   
Definition: The Internet Protocol (IP) is the method or protocol by which data is sent from one computer to another on the Internet. Each computer (known as a host) on the Internet has at least one IP address that uniquely identifies it from all other computers on the Internet.

When you send or receive data (for example, an e-mail note or a Web page), the message gets divided into little chunks called packets. Each of these packets contains both the sender's Internet address and the receiver's address.

Any packet is sent first to a gateway computer that understands a small part of the Internet.

The gateway computer reads the destination address and forwards the packet to an adjacent gateway that in turn reads the destination address and so forth across the Internet until one gateway recognizes the packet as belonging to a computer within its immediate neighborhood or domain.

That gateway then forwards the packet directly to the computer whose address is specified.

Because a message is divided into a number of packets, each packet can, if necessary, be sent by a different route across the Internet. Packets can arrive in a different order than the order they were sent in.

The Internet Protocol just delivers them. It's up to another protocol, the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) to put them back in the right order.

IP is a connectionless protocol, which means that there is no continuing connection between the end points that are communicating.

Each packet that travels through the Internet is treated as an independent unit of data without any relation to any other unit of data. (The reason the packets do get put in the right order is because of TCP, the connection-oriented protocol that keeps track of the packet sequence in a message.)

In the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) communication model, IP is in layer 3, the Networking Layer.

The most widely used version of IP today is Internet Protocol Version 4 (IPv4). However, IP Version 6 (IPv6) is also beginning to be supported. IPv6 provides for much longer addresses and therefore for the possibility of many more Internet users.

IPv6 includes the capabilities of IPv4 and any server that can support IPv6 packets can also support IPv4 packets.


IP_May 2010.jpg




























AGE OF THE SMARTPHONE

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The future is now!!!
 

iPhone_May 2010.jpgSo how smart is your phone:

Smartphones Drive Handset Sales







PRIVACY FACE

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Facebook_April 2010.pngThe issue of privacy has hit Facebook right in the face!

Facebook meets the "Unlike" button

So is your privacy important to you???

Are your secrets safe?





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